Book #17

ncube

NCUBE Mthuli, LEYEKA LUFUMPA Charles, Infrastructure in Africa: Lessons for Future Development, Policy Press, 2016.

This book presents a comprehensive account and analysis of the current state of infrastructure in Africa with an unprecedented level of detail. Covering nearly twenty specific topical issues for the ongoing development of African infrastructure—including the economic and political aspects of infrastructure development, financing and the mobilization of domestic resources, and the potential for social inclusion – the volume explicitly challenges current policy, practice, and thinking in this area.

Book #9

de-zeeuw-drechsel

DE ZEEUW Henk, DRECHSEL Pay (eds), Cities and Agriculture: Developing Resilient Urban Food Systems, Routledge, 2015.

As people increasingly migrate to urban settings and more than half of the world’s population now lives in cities, it is vital to plan and provide for sustainable and resilient food systems which reflect this challenge. This volume presents experience and evidence-based “state of the art” chapters on the key dimensions of urban food challenges and types of intra- and peri-urban agriculture. 

The book provides urban planners, local policy makers and urban development practitioners with an overview of crucial aspects of urban food systems based on an up to date review of research results and practical experiences in both developed and developing countries. By doing so, the international team of authors provides a balanced textbook for students of the growing number of courses on sustainable agriculture, food and urban studies, as well as a solid basis for well-informed policy making, planning and implementation regarding the development of sustainable, resilient and just urban food systems.

Book #2

abbott

ABBOTT John, Green Infrastructure for Sustainable Urban Development in Africa, Routledge, 2012.

This book shows for the first time how green infrastructure can work in an African urban context. On one level it provides a major rethinking of the role of infrastructure in urban society since the creation of networked infrastructure in the early twentieth century. On another, it explores the changing paradigms of urban development through the fundamental question of how decisions are made.

With a focus on Africa’s fast-growing secondary towns, where 70 per cent of the urban population live, the book explains how urban infrastructure provides the key to the relationship between economic development and social equity, through the mediation of natural resources. Adopting this view enables investment to be channelled more effectively to provide the engine for economic growth, while providing equitable services for all residents. At the same time, the mediation of resource flows integrates the metabolism of the city into the wider ecosystem. This vision leads to a new way of thinking about infrastructure, giving clear definition to the concept of green infrastructure.

On the basis of research gathered throughout an extensive career, John Abbott draws in particular from his experience in Ethiopia to demonstrate the ways in which infrastructure needs to respond to the economies, societies and natural environments of twenty-first century urban Africa.